From the Pastor

Fr. Mike Comer shares his thoughts on Scripture, spirituality and the challenges of living the Gospel.

happy father's day

June 16, 2024
Many years ago, I heard a comedian talking about how kids relate differently to fathers and mothers. He spoke about a boy who played football throughout his school years. His dad took him to practice, helped to coach the team, constantly working with his son to strengthen his play. And the boy became a really good football player.  He got a full scholarship to college based on his skill at football. In his junior year he was in one of the major bowl games and ran for many yards, scoring a touchdown.  When he did, he raised the ball, did a little dance, looked at the camera, and shouted, “Hi, Mom!”
    
And such is the way of life. Moms always seem to get the first and last notice and thanks. And fathers get whatever is left over. I think most dads have made peace with that.  They know that they will almost always come in second best. 
But at least for one day out of the year, we turn our focus to our dads, remembering the sacrifices and love that we have received from them.  Perhaps it is only when we look at families in which there is not an active, present, and involved father, that we can see the significance of dads in a child’s life. As I have noted before, prisons are full of men and women who grew up essentially fatherless.  Children in those situations are far more likely to fall into drugs, crime, gangs, and promiscuity. Obviously, that is not the only factor that leads to such problems, but it is the primary factor.
    
As a culture we need to find ways to help young men learn how to be fathers. One way is, as we do today, to understand the importance of fathers and to celebrate them, especially the really good ones.
    
Dads, Happy Father’s Day! May God bless you and fill you with His grace, His peace, and His love.
Fr. Mike Comer
A rainbow over Lough Eske in County Donegal, Ireland.